Kalle Crop Top

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I made this Kalle crop top a few weeks ago, but with thesis work and other stuff, I just now had the time to have photos taken and to write some words about it. And I am a total fan of this pattern! It’s the first Closet Case pattern that I made, and I am completely convinced. The high-low hem is beautiful and the collar is the perfect width for me. I really like the short sleeve shape and the big pleat in the back.

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Summer of Basics – Part Two

The second part of my Summer of Basics outfit is done! My goal is to create an entire outfit, and now only the third and last part is missing. I am quite sure, I will manage to get the outfit done by the end of the month. My black silk shirt is cut and ready to assemble. So here is my second piece, my summer scarf! I wrote down the pattern, you can find it below or on Ravelry.

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Acorn Sweater

It is finally getting hot in Berlin, and very much against the season, I finished my Acorn Sweater, designed by Junko Okamoto. Starting this sweater was quite impulsively – I saw the pattern and immediately wanted to start. I thought it could be a good way to use up leftover yarn from my No Frills Sweater, and to finally use the light grey Drops Puna yarn that I had bought on sale in winter and never used for its intended purpose.

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Summer of Basics – Part One

As already said in my plan for Summer of Basics, I am challenging myself to make an entire outfit. The first part is already done and ready to present! The cotton scarf is almost done, and the third piece (a refashioned blouse) is waiting to be made, but other projects came between. Now that I am D.O.N.E. with my master thesis, I feel my creative energy coming back and I plan on using this to significantly reduce my stash this summer.

But now to the pants! I used a vintage Burda pattern from a magazine from the 80s.

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Summer of Basics – The Plan

I am starting the Summer of Basics make-along late, but I am ready and challenging myself to make an outfit entirely out of materials that I already own. Not buying new fabrics is hard, especially with the new Atelier Brunette collection around, but I have so much fabric stashed that needs to be used. I will also finally do things that sit in my making queue for too long, so I hope this will be a success all over! Creating an entire outfit is quite the challenge for me, as I usually just make single garments without really planning a wardrobe or matching items together. I always figure, if I like it, it will fit my style… However, this time it will be different!

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My plan is to make:

  • Summer pants with deep pockets from an 80s Burda magazine from a beautiful blue cotton fabric
  • A black silk shirt, for which I will recycle an old skirt from my mother with beautiful pearl buttons
  • A summer scarf from rust colored cotton yarn in a cross stich pattern

I already started the scarf and the pants, so I am quite confident I will finish my Summer of Basics-Outfit in time!

Something about Knitting Needles

I am almost done writing my master thesis, which means I have extra free time for knitting and sewing and new projects! But first, I want to share something that I learned the other day, while buying some wool to finish a sweater. I am currently knitting two projects on 4,5 needles and needed an extra pair. I asked in the shop, but they just had interchangeable needles from a different brand then the ones I already have. I was ready to search for simple cheap needles to finish my project in another shop… But! The friendly shop owner informed me that all interchangeable knitting needles, that use a screwed connection, are all produced by the same manufacturer (at lest in the european market, I guess…).

For me, that was such a revolutionary information! It means that I don’t have to stick to the more expensive KnitPro needle collection, but I can add other, cheaper brands to my set! I can buy exchangeable needles anywhere, and they will all fit together! Knitting can be an expensive hobby, so this is a nice way to show some ways to make it more financially accessible!

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The two pairs on the left are KnitPro and the pair on the right is Drops.

Just to compare: the KnitPro needle tips size 4,5 cost 5,99€, the Drops ones 4,50€. And just the colors are a bit different… 1,50€ saved that I can spend on more wool! Maybe this was not new for you, but for me, this is quite a revelation.

Anyway, of course there are other brands and systems out there: Addi needles are the only ones still produced in Germany (for the seventh generation!), and the have beautiful (but pricey) needles made of olive wood. For straight needles and crochet hooks, there are several small producers existing, some of them working with social projects, like these multi colored crochet hooks from Switzerland.

Nude Knitting

Currently I am supposed to be busy busy busy writing my master thesis, but even that can’t keep me from researching knitting patterns and looking at what all the knitters out there are creating! Here are two examples that I found especially funny lately:

The „Sexy Socks“ by fiber artist Ýr Jóhannsdóttir from Iceland

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I love how these socks are mocking beauty norms. The description how to make them can be found on Ravelry.

The „Nudekinis“ from dutch knitting artist duo Club Geluk

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Club Geluk is knitting everything from ham to horse sweaters and offer workshops, books and knitting patterns.

With these knits you can be dressed and still look naked, protest freedom for nipples even when it’s still cold. The possibilities are endless!

Stretching for Knitters

A few weeks ago I started knitting a cotton top, and simultaneously started to have pain and numb feelings in my hands and fingers – something that probably a lot of knitters, crocheters and other crafters can relate to. Maybe my hands got tired after a long season of intense knitting, maybe the texture of the cotton yarn challenged my hands in new ways… Anyway, the pain is gone now, but it left me thinking and reflecting on how I, as a knitter, can take better care of my most important tools – my hands.

I think it all starts with acknowledging the importance of my hands as my main instruments, and at the same time, accepting that they have their limitations, as do body and mind in general. I learned through many mistakes when I need to stop making (when I am getting too angry at the fabric for example…). And now I need to learn how to see the limits of power of my hands (and arms, shoulders, back…) to make sure they will enable me to make things in the future.

The most important thing for me is to change projects every now and then. From bamboo needles to metal ones, big yarn to thin yarn, from knitting to crochet to embroidery or sewing. Or even taking a break from fiber stuff sometimes and make a drawing or take photos. This gives my hands the needed change of movements to prevent them from hurting. Other things include giving myself a hand massage and using a nice hand cream.

From my days doing actual sports I still remember my favorite stretching exercises for the hands, and I took pictures to share with fellow crafters. Take a moment before or after a knitting session and stretch:

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Let’s start with the easiest: curl one hand into a fist and put light pressure on it with your other hand (repeat for both hands).
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Same principle as above: make your palms touch each other and apply pressure.
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Slightly more complicated: turn your right palm to the right side, and hug the right hand with your left hand. Your left thumb touches your right pinky finger. Apply pressure with your left thumb and at the same time pull your right thumb to the left – this creates a rotating motion. Additionally, pull your hands down. Repeat for the other side.
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Again, turn your right palm to the right side and hug it with your left. Move your elbows downward and at the same time pull your hands to your chest. Repeat for the other side.
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Turn your right palm to face forward and grab it with your left hand as if to shake your own hands. Rotate your left hand inwards (by applying pressure on your right pinky finger area) and move both hands upwards in a round motion. Repeat for the other side.

I hope this helps!

A New Thing: Kantan Embroidery

I recently rediscovered embroidery after having forgotten about it for some time. A few years ago, when I first discovered Jenny Hart’s work at Sublime Stitching, I experimented a bit with embroidery, but I never really knew what to make out of it. The random embroidered fabric pieces went in a box and got forgotten over time.

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In the last weeks I started noticing embroidery again, thanks to embroidery artists Tessa Perlow  and Sofia Salazar, whose modern and artistic designs tempted me so much, that I bought my own Kantan embroidery needle to try out a new (and faster) embroidery method. I like the chain stitch it produces, but I still have to figure out how to best use the needle. A embroidery hoop that can be fixed to a table might be helpful, as you actually need both hands to work.

I made my first trial piece in one sitting, without noticing how the time went past, totally captured by the work. It’s definitely better suited for continuous lines than single letters.

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That’s a wordplay on the french word for lesbian – gouine!

My next plan is to create a shirt inspired by this t-shirt:

Hand-Chain-stitch-Swirl-Rainbow tee #grooveisintheheart

A post shared by ⚡️Tessa⚡️ (@tessa_perlow) on

I am using vintage embroidery thread that I had in my stash and some simple unbleached cotton.

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Patchwork Weekend

This weekend I got into a serious patchwork frenzy. I recently organized my fabric stash and leftovers, and this made me want to play with all these tiny pieces that are useless on their own, but that I couldn’t bare to throw away. I started out with some little patchwork pieces that later became little drawstring bags, and then went on to make a bigger piece for a pillow case. I made use of even the tiniest piece of fabric! I also used up some leftover sleeves from vintage shirts, and it is incredible how much fabric comes out of a shirt sleeve when you cut it open! Cutting and arranging the pieces, sewing everything together was a lot of fun and actually felt more like a creative practice than anything else I have made in the last months. Maybe that’s why I can’t stop!

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small patchwork bags that just need strings now…
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Patchwork pillow in good company

While doing that I binge-listened to all the Have Company Podcasts, instead of watching/listening to random TV-shows as I usually do. In the podcast episodes Marlee of Have Company interviews resident artists and friends about their art, practices, how it is to be a small business owner and other things. It’s great! At the end she always asks people what they are excited about and I just wanted to write what I am excited about at the moment: A few days ago I received a little package from Little Red Tarot, including the Herbal Homestead Journal, a queer Tarot book called She Is Sitting in the Night and the beautiful Moon Angel Cards by Rebekah Erev. I am so excited about all these little things! The Herbal Homestead Journal includes simple and accessible ways of working with plants for every month and I am already looking forward of going back to this book over the course of this year.

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The first card that I drew from the Moon Angel Cards is Nr. 5 Go!

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I am also excited about this Coldcream from Weleda that I bought because I have these red dry spots in my face from the cold and it smells so good (and helps)!

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Beach tee made from leftover cotton and linen

I also made two patchwork t-shirts in my Patchwork Weekend, and reused some shirt sleeves, random leftovers from other projects and small pieces of fabric from my collection. I was inspired by this woven Geodesic Top and these Wabi Sabi tees, and again, just piecing the squares together was so satisfying. I cut 30×30 cm squares from the fabric, pieced it together and then cut out the neckline, easy! I will probably make more for summer (that will come at some point… we just have to stay optimistic).

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Patchwork tee made from all recycled silk